Lake District Images – Photos

•July 4, 2009 • 5 Comments

After spending a fantastic 5 days up in Ambleside in the Lake District last week I thought I’d share a few photos that I took…

Grasmere & Rydal Water, Lake District, Cumbria, UK

~ Grasmere & Rydal Water, Lake District, Cumbria, UK ~


Nikon D40 : 18mm
f/11 : 1/30 sec : ISO 200


Rydal Cave, Ambleside, Lake District, Cumbria, UK

~ Rydal Cave, Ambleside, Lake District, Cumbria, UK ~


Nikon D40 : 18mm
f/3.5 : 1/200 sec : ISO 200


Rydal Cave, Ambleside, Lake District, Cumbria, UK

~ Rydal Cave, Ambleside, Lake District, Cumbria, UK ~


Nikon D40 : 26mm
f/4 : 1/150 sec : ISO 200


Waterhead Jetty, Ambleside, Lake District, Cumbria, UK

~ Waterhead Jetty, Ambleside, Lake District, Cumbria, UK ~


Nikon D40 : 18mm
f/22 : 2 secs : ISO 200


Waterhead Jetty, Ambleside, Lake District, Cumbria, UK

~ Waterhead Jetty, Ambleside, Lake District, Cumbria, UK ~


Nikon D40 : 18mm
f/11 : 1/15 sec : ISO 200


Loughrigg Tarn, Lake District, Cumbria, UK

~ Loughrigg Tarn, Lake District, Cumbria, UK ~


Nikon D40 : 18mm
f/9 : 1/60 sec : ISO 200


Tree, Nook End Farm, Ambleside, Lake District, Cumbria, UK

~ Tree, Nook End Farm, Ambleside, Lake District, Cumbria, UK ~


Nikon D40 : 18mm
f/3.5 : 1/160 sec : ISO 200


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Rochester Castle, Kent, UK – Photos

•June 16, 2009 • 1 Comment

A friend of mine asked me to take some photos of Rochester Castle, where they live, so he could present it to his wife as a birthday present. It was a balmy night with the sun setting behind a cloud over the River Medway.

I managed to take a couple of the castle bathed in the evening glow, a surreal take on the castle and a shot of the silver river as the sun set.


Rochester Castle, Kent, UK

Nikon D40 : 20mm
f/11 : 1/2 sec : ISO 200


From Mike Franklin Photography


Rochester Castle, Kent, UK

Nikon D40 : 18mm
f/11 : 1/4 sec : ISO 200


Rochester Castle, Kent, UK

Nikon D40 : 18mm
f/11 : 1/6 sec : ISO 200


Sunset on the River Medway, Rochester, Kent, UK

Nikon D40 : 18mm
f/11 : 1/13 sec : ISO 200


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Cuckmere River, Cuckmere Haven, Sussex – Photo

•June 11, 2009 • 7 Comments

Looking through my old photos for something to turn into a card for a friend of mine’s birthday I came across some photos of the Cuckmere River near Eastbourne taken way back on the 4th November 2007.

From Wikipedia:-


The River Cuckmere rises near Heathfield in East Sussex, England on the southern slopes of the Weald. The name of the river probably comes from an Old English word meaning fast-flowing, since it descends over 200 ft (100 m) in its initial four miles (6.4 km)

The river has many tributaries at its upper end, the principal one being the River Bull; and its main channel begins at Hellingly.

After crossing the Low Weald area of farmland south, the Cuckmere breaks through the South Downs in its own valley, to reach the English Channel at Cuckmere Haven east of Seaford at the Seven Sisters. The lower part of its course is marked by meandering, which is a well-known feature of the area. The Cuckmere Valley Nature Reserve is located here. The Cuckmere Valley civil parish takes its name from the river.

The course of the river was historically diverted to allow improved irrigation for agriculture in the area. The area is a major tourist attraction, and on the west side of the river, where the A259 crosses the river at Exceat is the popular Golden Galleon Public House.

A collaboration of the National Trust, Natural England, Environment Agency, East Sussex County Council and various other environmental and conservation groups has been set up, and is talking to local residents, businesses and visitors about how to manage the estuary in the future. Presently, a shingle beach and artificial river banks prevent seawater penetrating the uppermost areas of the Cuckmere Valley. However, with sea level rise and increasing costs of protection, together with growing evidence that the area would be more ecologically rich if allowed to return to its natural state, it is planned to stop the repair of this blockade, which will result in the periodic flooding of this highly popular area. It is estimated, however that the benefit in terms of ecological expansion, will in the long term, act to improve tourism.


Cuckmere River, Cuckmere Haven, Sussex, UK

~ Cuckmere River, Cuckmere Haven, Sussex, UK ~


Nikon D40 : 18mm
f/11 : 1/160 sec : ISO 200


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North Downs Way Walk – Dover to Folkestone – Photos

•May 5, 2009 • 4 Comments

Sunday 15th March – North Downs Way Walk – Dover to Folkestone – 9 miles.


Acoustic Sound Mirror, Abbot's Cliff, Dover, Kent, UK

~ Acoustic Sound Mirror, Abbot’s Cliff, Dover, Kent, UK ~


Nikon D40 : 18mm
f/11 : 1/80 sec : ISO 200


Leaving the car outside Dover Rail Station I walked over past the Western Heights Fort, looking out over Dover Harbour, past a Templar Church and along the clifftops to Folkestone. At then end of the walk I caught the train back again to Dover.


~ Dover Castle ~


~ Dover Western Harbour from Western Heights gun emplacements ~


~ Dover Eastern Harbour from Western Heights gun emplacements ~


~ Remains of Templar Church ~

The remains of a small early 12th-century church built by the Knights Templar. The order of the Knights Templar was founded in Jerusalem in 1118 to protect pilgrims visiting the Holy Land after the First Crusade. The Order spread rapidly throughout Europe, with its work supported by the many estates donated by wealthy benefactors. In 1128 the order reached England, with this site becoming one of it’s earliest properties.

Templar churches usually have a circular nave, as here, in imitation of the church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Indications are that this site was abandoned before 1185. The remains were discovered by military engineers fortifying Western Heights in the early 19th-century.


~ Dover Harbour and coastal railway from Shakespeare Cliff ~


~ Folkestone, the A20 and the entrance to Samphire Hoe from Shakespeare Cliff ~


~ Samphire Hoe ~


~ Round Down (National Trust) and railway air shaft from Shakespeare Tunnel ~


~ Samphire Hoe ~

Samphire Hoe is a part of Kent, United Kingdom, consisting of reclaimed land made from 4.9 million cubic metres of chalk marl dug to create the Channel Tunnel deposited on the seaward side of the famous White cliffs of Dover. It is accessible by the public via single track tunnel controlled by traffic lights which crosses over the Kent Coast railway line. Visitor facilities are provided including car-parking, toilets and a cafe.

The ecology of Samphire Hoe is very special and what is now chalk meadow-land is home to a number of nationally rare plant species including the Early Spider Orchid.


~ Samphire Hoe ~


~ Samphire Hoe ~


~ World War II gun emplacement above Samphire Hoe ~


~ Acoustic Sound Mirror on Abbots Cliff ~

A forerunner of radar, acoustic mirrors were built on the south and northeast coasts of England between about 1916 and the 1930s. The ‘listening ears’ were intended to provide early warning of incoming enemy aircraft.


~ The English Channel from The Battle Of Britain Memorial ~


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South Downs Way Walk – Exton to Buriton – Photos

•March 26, 2009 • 5 Comments

Friday 20th March – South Downs Way Walk – Exton to Buriton – 12 miles.


South Downs Way, Salt Hill, Hampshire, UK

~ Salt Hill ~


Nikon D40 : 18mm
f/11 : 1/100 sec : ISO 200


Leaving the car in Buriton I caught the bus at the Master Robert Inn – Countryliner Bus No 95 – to Petersfield Tescos and then caught another bus – Brijan Tours Bus No 17 – to Exton, River Meon stop.


~ The ascent from the disused railway line in Exton towards Old Winchester Hill ~


~ Fields on view from Old Winchester Hill approach ~


~ Old Winchester Hill ~

On the summit of the hill is an Iron Age hill fort. Within the hill fort can also be found Bronze Age barrows. The barrows date from between 4,500 and 3,500 BC whilst the fort itself is believed to be Celtic in origin. More modern archaeology dates from World War II when the British Army used the hill as a mortar testing range. Some unexploded Ordnance may still remain in ‘fenced-off’ sections of the hill however grazing hill-sheep access all areas so danger to the casual walker is likely to be low.


~ Descending down Whitewool Hangar towards Whitewool Farm. ~

Salt Hill in the middle horizon and Butser Hill far left horizon


~ Two continental jet airliners seemingly having a near miss ~


~ View from foot of Henwood Down towards Salt Hill ~


~ View from Salt Hill towards Butser Hill ~


~ Salt Hill Signpost ~


~ Salt Hill Signpost ~


~ Towards East Meon and Park Hill from Hyden Cross ~


~ Trees on Hyden Hill ~


~ From Hyden Hill looking back to East Meon (right) and Salt Hill (left) ~


~ Field & Trees at the top of Tegdown Hill ~


~ Windmill Hill, middle distance and Chichester Harbour faintly on the horizon ~

View from North Lane near Butser Hill


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My First Photo In Print

•February 26, 2009 • 7 Comments

Thanks to Tom Munro, a Dorset AONB Countryside Officer, I had my first photo published in print recently… An innocuous photo taken on a walk down in Dorset of a field of wheat and poppies was chosen to illustrate an article about an area in Dorset known as The South Dorset Ridgeway.


My first photo in print... Your Dorset - www.dorsetforyou.com

~ Your Dorset – http://www.dorsetforyou.com ~


Original

Poppies growing in wheat, Martinstown, Dorset, UK

~ Poppies growing in wheat, Martinstown, Dorset, UK ~


Nikon D40 : 55mm
f/11 : 1/160 sec : ISO 200


► More Dorset shots here!

Wast Water, Lake District – Photo

•February 23, 2009 • 3 Comments

From Wikipedia:-


Wast Water or Wastwater is a lake in the Lake District National Park, England. The lake is approximately 4.6 kilometres (almost 3 miles) long and 600 metres (more than a third of a mile) wide, and is located in the Wasdale valley. It is the deepest lake in England, at 79 metres (258 feet), and is owned by the National Trust.

It is one of the finest examples of a glacially ‘over-deepened’ valley. The surface of the lake is about 200 feet above sea level, while its bottom is over 50 feet below sea level.

The name of the lake and its valley is pronounced as in was, not with a hard a. The lake is named “Wast Water” on Ordnance Survey maps, but the spelling “Wastwater” is used with roughly equal frequency, including by its owner, the National Trust, along with the Cumbria Tourist Board, and the Lake District National Park Authority.

The steep slopes on the south-eastern side of the lake, leading up to the summits of Whin Rigg and Illgill Head, are known as the “Wastwater Screes” or on some maps as “The Screes”. These screes formed as a result of ice and weathering erosion on the rocks of the Borrowdale Volcanic Group, that form the fells to the East of the lake, towards Eskdale. They are approximately 2,000 feet, from top to base, the base being about 200 feet below the surface of the lake.

The head of the Wasdale valley is surrounded by some of the highest mountains in England, including Scafell Pike, Great Gable and Lingmell.

Wast Water is the source of the River Irt which flows into the Irish Sea near Ravenglass.

A popular path runs the length of the lake, through the boulders and scree fall at the base of this craggy fell-side. On the north-western side are the cliffs of Buckbarrow (a part of Seatallan) and the upturned-boat shape of Yewbarrow.


Wast Water, Lake District, Cumbria, UK

~ Wast Water, Lake District, Cumbria, UK ~


Nikon D40 : 18mm
f/11 : 1/160 sec : ISO 200


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